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EPISODE#60
CATHEDRAL SQUARE: GUEST IS MONSIGNOR MIKE HEHER

Host Fr. Christopher Smith welcomes longtime friend and collaborator in ministry, Monsignor Mike Heher, to the program today. Msgr. Mike is the former Vicar General of the Diocese of Orange and the current pastor of St. Anne Church in Seal Beach. He is also an accomplished author.

Give a listen as they reflect on many years ministering to God’s people in the Diocese of Orange!

 

 

 

 

 

Original broadcast date 7/31/21

SPECIAL-NEEDS PARISHIONERS RECEIVE SACRAMENTS

Bishop Thanh Thai Nguyen was the principal celebrant at a Sept. 26 Mass at St. Juliana Falconieri Church in Fullerton, during which five special-needs individuals received the sacraments of First Holy Communion and Confirmation.  

The Mass was held inside the church with attendees wearing masks and appropriately distanced. 

The following parishes provide faith formation for those with special needs. 

 

ST. ANTHONY CLARET, ANAHEIM  

Faith formation and sacramental prep – multiple disabilities. Spanish. 

 

ST. BONAVENTURE PARISH, HUNTINGTON BEACH  

Sacramental prep for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. English. 

 

ST. JULIANA FALCONIERI, FULLERTON  

Faith formation and sacramental prep – multiple disabilities – ages 7-22. English. 

 

ST. JUSTIN MARTYR, ANAHEIM   

Faith formation and Sacramental Prep – multiple disabilities. English and Spanish. 

 

ST. NORBERT, ORANGE 

Faith formation and Sacramental Prep – multiple disabilities. Spanish. 

 

ST. POLYCARP, STANTON 

Faith formation and Sacramental Prep – multiple disabilities for children in middle school and high school. English and Spanish. 

 

ST. JOSEPH, SANTA ANA 

Faith formation and Sacramental Prep – multiple disabilities. English
and Spanish. 

 

ST. KILIAN PARISH, MISSION VIEJO  

Faith formation and Sacramental Prep – multiple disabilities. Grades 1-12. English. 

 

SAN FRANCISCO SOLANO, RANCHO SANTA MARGARITA 

Children of Christ’s Heart for Families of Children with Special Needs- any diagnosis. Meet 2nd Wednesday every month (Excluding July and August) in the parish lounge. Contact Moira Byron 949-842-1266 or 5byrons@cox.net. English. 

 

SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA, LAKE FOREST 

Friends in Faith, socialization, faith formation and sacramental prep for adults. English 

 

‘DISCOVER SERVITE’ OPEN HOUSE SET FOR OCT. 25 

‘Discover Servite’ Open House is an exciting opportunity to experience the Servite difference. Student ambassadors will lead small groups in learning more about why Servite is the best place for your son’s high school education. Representatives from administration, faculty, staff, athletics, and activities will be available to answer questions and share information.  COVID-19 health protocols will be followed.  Registration is required:  www.DiscoverServite.com 

INDOOR WEEKDAY MASSES RESUME, SUNDAY MASSES REMAIN OUTDOORS TO ACCOMMODATE CROWDS

Story updated Sept. 10, 2020: Orange County has moved from purple to red on the state’s COVID-19 tier ranking, allowing for limited indoor worship. However the Diocese of Orange will continue to celebrate Sunday Mass (and vigil Masses) outside to accommodate the larger crowds. Weekday Masses may be celebrated indoors with 100 people or less, or 25 percent of capacity. Parish pastors will decide, depending on anticipated attendance, if weekday Masses will be held indoors or outdoors at their parishes. Baptisms, weddings and funeral Masses may be held indoors with 100 people or less attending.


Editor’s Note: As we go to press with the Sept. 6, 2020 issue of OC Catholic, indoor Masses remain suspended. It’s anticipated that we’ll soon be able to re-open our churches with limited attendance. 

 

One of the silver linings in the dark cloud of the coronavirus is the emergence of outdoor Masses, weddings, baptisms, confirmations, and funerals throughout Orange County’s Catholic parishes. 

At a time when isolation admittedly is a somber part of Catholic family life, Diocese of Orange parishes are bringing our beloved sacraments and liturgical celebrations outdoors in a variety of original ways. 

“Science seems to be saying that the coronavirus doesn’t do as well outdoors,” observes Most Rev. Timothy Freyer, auxiliary bishop, so diocesan leaders this spring blessed the idea of heading outside with religious ceremonies. “The people are reassured that it’s a safe, clean, positive experience.” 

Parishioners appreciate being outdoors, Bishop Freyer says. “It offers us a chance to be in nature, and there’s a sense of community in standing together under the sky.” 

At Our Lady Queen of Angels Church in Newport Beach, Pastor Steve Sallot says parishioners are enthused about outdoor Masses, drive-through Eucharistic celebrations, and a recent Anointing of the Sick ceremony. “We are blessed here in Southern California with generally good weather,” Fr. Sallot notes, “and we are especially blessed along the coast to usually have a breeze and cooler temperatures. 

“I must admit when the sun is blazing and I’m covered in vestments, standing outside, I miss the air conditioning in the church,” he adds. “But most of us feel blessed to be in the outside environment, especially during the early-hour liturgies or the early-evening liturgies. It is beautiful!” 

When the pandemic first hit and churches were forced to close, many parishes immediately hopped online and began livestreaming Masses, offering daily social media meditations and prayers, and established virtual Bible studies and other church ‘gatherings,’ Bishop Freyer explains.  

“We’ve learned how to use technology and tools that hopefully we will continue to use for years to come,” he says. “Livestreamed Bible studies, Engaged Encounters, prayer meetings – we want to continue to see those, because the sick and homebound keep their close connections to their local parishes.” 

In addition to longtime parishioners, some of those who make their way to a livestreamed Mass or visit a drive-by sacrament are non-practicing Catholics or those who are interested in the Catholic faith, Bishop Freyer says. “There are new relationships with the Church coming from our livestreaming efforts,” he declares. “As much as possible, our Church of tradition is reading the signs of the times and becoming innovative, finding effective new ways of doing all the ministries.” He notes that these new efforts are a logical extension of Bishop Kevin Vann’s Strategic Plan, the diocese’s recently adopted guide for growth. 

Pastor Angelos Sebastian of St. Kilian Church in Mission Viejo agrees. “What we are doing now is reaching more people than we ever imagined,” Fr. Sebastian says. “Last week I met someone who said he wasn’t ready to come back to Church, but he watched our social media messages and attended our online Masses, and said ‘I realize now that the Church is not the same anymore’ and is open to coming back.” 

At St. Kilian, some Masses are livestreamed, all are offered outside with people remaining in their cars until communion, and a drive-by weekly confession service attracts hundreds of cars. 

“I’m meeting with people who have fallen away from the Church and they are thrilled to embrace the Church because the Church is embracing them,” Fr. Sebastian says. “They tell me they never will leave again.” 

While the pandemic has been a huge disruption, the Church has adapted creatively to live and streaming services. “This can be a clarifying moment for us,” notes Katie Dawson, diocesan director of parish faith formation and evangelization. 

“The outdoor worship services have been surprisingly better than I imagined,” says Father Daniel Seo, parochial vicar at Holy Family Cathedral in Orange. “The parishioners have been very respectful and doing their best to maintain an atmosphere of silent prayer before beginning. Sometimes, I find that there is better silent prayer and preparation before beginning the celebration outside, than in our church.” 

Church leaders say they hope that moving forward parishes will offer hybrid programs that will continue to reach people live and online. “Our parishioners share the links with their friends and families,” Fr. Sebastian notes, “and we have attendees from 24 different countries watching our livestreamed Masses.” 

In addition to offering outdoors funerals and weddings, local parishes are scheduling outdoor baptisms, RCIA ceremonies, and confirmations. “I think we will see our ministries taking place in different ways moving forward,” Bishop Freyer says. “The faith formation efforts of our parishes provide flexibility and allow individuals to have a relationship with Christ and the Church.  

“I’m grateful that the people have been so positive and for their support of our parishes,” he adds. “It’s been inspiring.” 

 

EPISODE #253
EMPOWERED BY THE SPIRIT: FAITH IN TODAY’S WORLD

Join Deacon Steve Greco as he welcomes a very special guest to the studio, Fr. Augustine Puchner.

Fr. Augustine is a Norbertine priest, and he is pastor at St. John the Baptist Church in Costa Mesa, CA.

They discuss among other things the Norbertine order, The Holy Spirit, Divine Mercy and aspects of enhancing and enriching our faith in today’s world.

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 8/9/2020

EPISODE #250
EMPOWERED BY THE SPIRIT: “EVANGELIZATION NOW” WITH GUEST FR. AL BACA

Deacon Steve Greco is thrilled to welcome a very special guest to the studio for our show today. It’s none other than Fr. Al Baca, the Diocese of Orange Director of Evangelization and Faith Formation.

Tune in for this lively and timely discussion!

 

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 7/19/2020

EPISODE#206
OC CATHOLIC RADIO: GUEST DEACON STEVE GRECO SPEAKS ON OUR CURRENT PANDEMIC

Each week, we bring you compelling conversation with church leaders and laity. Our host and primary speaker is Rick Howick.

Today’s guest is Deacon Steve Greco, the host of the weekly radio show EMPOWERED BY THE SPIRIT, heard on Sundays at 12 noon on Relevant Radio. He’s also the founder and president of Spirit-Filled Hearts Ministry.

Deacon Steve has just written a very timely book for these times. It’s called “Be Not Afraid.”

Give us a listen and spread the word!

 

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 7/18/20

EPISODE#204
OC CATHOLIC RADIO: GUEST IS DARYL SEQUEIRA

Each week, we bring you compelling conversation with church leaders and laity. Today, host Rick Howick welcomes back one of our favorite guests, Daryl Sequeira. Daryl is the former ‘chair’ of the theology department at Servite High School in Anaheim. He currently serves in Catholic education in the state of Arizona.

Today’s episode will be a discussion on where we are as a society in 2020. There is so much that has come against Catholics and the church as a whole, so we’re going to dig in and talk about it.

Tune in for this very thoughtful discussion.

 

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 7/4/20

WHY YOU SHOULD REMEMBER THE MISSIONS WHEN YOU MISS THE SACRAMENTS

Washington D.C., Apr 20, 2020 / 04:00 pm (CNA) – Many U.S. Catholics have limited or no access to the sacraments during the coronavirus pandemic, bringing to many parishes a reality faced in other parts of the country on a regular basis.

Kevin Day, director of the Catholic Home Missions national collection of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), told CNA on April 20 that Catholics in American many dioceses were experiencing circumstances “not unlike” the situation in mission territories around the world where Catholics might see a priest once or twice a year to hear confessions, bless marriages, and offer Mass in person.

“One of the things that I find interesting, is that everyone is facing this reality of being cut off from the sacraments, the physical sacraments, and the physical communion of the Church community,” Day said.

He added that it’s an “educational opportunity” for U.S. Catholics to learn about life in “mission” territory—including “mission” dioceses in their home country.

“Home missions” are U.S. dioceses that require outside assistance to provide basic pastoral care to Catholics, often because they are located in rural parts of the country or in the predominantly-Protestant South where Catholics are a small minority.

These situations are more common than one would think, Day told CNA, making up around 40 percent of U.S. dioceses. They include dioceses in more sparsely-populated regions like Alaska, the Mountain West, and West Texas, but also in other areas such as Alabama, Mississippi, Northern Louisiana and Appalachia.

These dioceses do not have the “critical mass” for an independent financial foundation, Day said, and they rely on outside financial assistance for pastoral needs, for which the USCCB set up the Catholic Home Missions Appeal in 1998.

Normally held on the last weekend of April, the special collection provides millions of dollars—more than $9.4 million in 2019 grants—of aid for purposes such as Hispanic ministry, evangelization, aid to mission parishes, and seminary education.

The 2020 collection was scheduled for the weekend of April 25-26, but as the recent pandemic forced the cancellation of public Masses across the U.S., “we expect this year to have a significant decline in revenue,” Day said.

For many dioceses reliant on outside funding, with parishes which are perhaps not equipped for online giving, the pandemic could pose another significant funding problem. Parishes in dioceses not considered mission territory were already feeling the squeeze in March once public Masses were cancelled, with parish staff already reporting furloughs and cuts.

Some parishes are better equipped than others to survive the economic downturn, Day said, as some mission parishes have no reserves and a small congregation.

The bishops’ conference has already been working with home mission dioceses to help them weather the storm, expediting the delivery of FY 2020 grant payments and allowing them to pay for pastoral needs or general operating expenses rather than the original specific purposes, said Day, and dioceses have already expressed appreciation for this “flexibility.”

Some of the unique challenges facing mission dioceses during this time are technological—“the learning curve that the dioceses and the parishes are going through to go online,” he said.

In many parishes, pastors eligible for retirement are still serving out of necessity. These in particular may not have the technological expertise to conduct video conferencing or virtually communicate with parishioners and staff, and in some cases some younger high school and college-age parishioners have already stepped in to help them get up to speed, Day said.

Ultimately, the current pandemic and the resultant social distancing and spiritual communion of the faithful is a lesson that the church is “more than the structures of our buildings,” he said.

“If anything we’re coming to understand that yes, the sacraments and being cut off from the Eucharist is something that we haven’t experienced, and we’re going to value the Eucharist more. But at the same time, we know now that our church is more than the structures of our buildings and the walls that contain the tabernacle. Our church is greater than that.”

EPISODE #121
TRENDING WITH TIMMERIE: 100 WAYS JP II CHANGED THE WORLD

Why is abortion a big debate during the Coronavirus?  Timmerie discusses this and her love for Saint John Paul II.  Timmerie is joined by guest Patrick Novocosky, author of the new book “100 Ways John Paul II Changed the World”  They’ll discuss not only how this saint changed the world but also their lives and things such as religious liberty, the value of suffering, death, human dignity, athletes, theology of the body, sexuality, and more.

 

* Update, since recording this, the ebook is available.  The hard copy publication date has been pushed out to October 2020.

 

Listen to more episodes at https://www.radiotrending.com/

Host Timmerie to run a workshop in your area https://www.radiotrending.com/booktimmerie

 

 

Originally broadcast on 4/4/20

EPISODE #120
TRENDING WITH TIMMERIE: EVERYTHING WILL CHANGE

People are fleeing California, and not because of the Coronavirus.  What can we learn about living more simply, staying within our means, and keeping family first?

Fr. Tim Grumbach joins Trending with Timmerie to discuss his experience as a priest unable to give the sacraments to the people, the good things we’ve seen come from the Covid-19 quarantine, and the things it may challenge us to do moving forward; and the ultimate sacrifice our priests are called to make.

 

Listen to more episodes at https://www.radiotrending.com/

Host Timmerie to run a workshop in your area https://www.radiotrending.com/booktimmerie

 

 

Originally broadcast on 3/29/20