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EPISODE#205
OC CATHOLIC RADIO: “FOCUS” COLLEGE CAMPUS MISSIONARIES

Each week, we bring you compelling conversation with church leaders and laity. Today, host Rick Howick welcomes Michal Sequeira and Zach Fiedler. These are young people who have a call to minister to their peers on college campuses.

FOCUS stands for “The Fellowship of Catholic University Students.” Over 700 Focus Missionaries are currently active on college campuses all over the U.S. today.

This kind of work is desperately needed in today’s society, and they need our support and prayers!

Please listen and SHARE this podcast!

FMI, go to: focus.com/give

 

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 7/11/20

STUDENTS SAY FOCUS MISSION TRIPS STRENGTHEN THEIR FAITH, DESIRE TO SERVE

DENVER (CNS) — In March, Ryan Clydesdale was looking forward to heading to Hawaii with friends for spring break, “but deep down I kept feeling pulled” to do something else.

That something else was to be part of a Peru mission trip sponsored by the Fellowship of Catholic University Students.

“I really felt like God was pushing me to go,” said Clydesdale, a student at the University of California Los Angeles.

“Josh (a FOCUS missionary at UCLA) kept inviting me until I finally said yes,” he said. “I was a little nervous at first because it was my first mission trip, but I knew the Lord was asking me to go and serve.”

This March, nearly 240 people traveled on 11 spring break trips to serve the people of Peru’s Pamplona Alta, one of the poorest neighborhoods in Lima, working alongside members of the Christian Life Movement. For the coming academic year, FOCUS plans 16 trips to Peru.

FOCUS officials say that such short-term mission trips are one way the organization aims to answer Pope Francis’ call for Catholics to “have the courage to go against the tide of … the culture of exclusion, of rejection.” That call came in his address to clergy during World Youth Day in Rio de Janiero in 2013.

Such a culture “is spreading,” he said. Today, “there is no place for the elderly or for the unwanted child; there is no time for that poor person in the street,” he said. In response, people of faith must “be servants of communion and of the culture of encounter!” the pontiff said.

Many students return from the FOCUS trips transformed in their faith and inspired to serve others. Clydesdale is no exception.

“The people in Pamplona changed me the most. Their physical poverty was very real, but their joy, gratitude and generosity were incredible to experience,” he said. “There was no running water, cramped living quarters and a giant hill they had to climb every day, but their spiritual wealth was obvious. I never expected to be so fulfilled to wake up early for Mass and then work alongside them all day under a hot sun.”

He and others in his group helped local volunteers build stairs in Pamplona. They “spent days mixing concrete, hauling it up the hill and pouring the stairs,” he explained.

But there was time to participate in Holy Week activities, “such as a Spanish rosary and Mass with the local families. On Good Friday, I was able to use my EMT training and work in the walk-in clinic for the community.”

The experience changed him as a Catholic, he said.

“Before this, I would say I was a nominal Catholic,” Clydesdale explained, “but now I feel proud to be a Catholic and I am excited to share my experience with others. I have real ownership of my faith now and I am getting more involved with the Catholic events on campus.”

Macie Weaver, a junior at the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, said she returned home from the FOCUS with “a greater desire to serve people at home.”

“Every day we made a difficult hike up the mountain to Pamplona. We worked with the people to build a wall to protect their houses from mud slides and rocks, and it was amazing to see the ways our hard work went directly to this community to leave a real impact,” she said.

She described the “significant impact” a woman named Blanca living in Pamplona had on her.

“We worked and laughed together every day. When we said goodbye, she gave me a hug and said I would always be in her heart and I was moved to tears,” Weaver said. “I will never forget her friendship! I was also really impacted by the daily adoration and Mass, as well as spiritual direction from the chaplain who came with us.”

“I connected on such a personal level with Blanca and others in Pamplona. As we worked side-by-side, we opened our hearts to each other and shared personal stories,” she added. “I realized I am called to love all the people in my life that same way. I’ve also learned to listen more to God in prayer.”

In Peru, Weaver said, she learned “Jesus has given me a real desire to be a missionary and I’m now looking into missionary organizations to serve in after I graduate.”

Josh Paiement is the FOCUS missionary at UCLA campus who invited Clydesdale to do the mission trip to Peru. He also was in Peru with Clydesdale and other students. The experience reinforced what he has long believed about the work of the Holy Spirit in our lives.

“The coolest part of going as a missionary was being re-convicted by how the Holy Spirit can transform lives!” he said. “On campus throughout the year, progress can be gradual, but on mission it happens in a powerful way in a short amount of time.”

“On mission,” he added, “the distractions of social media and school work are replaced with service and time for prayer and reflection.

This academic year, FOCUS Missions is sending over 2,000 participants on more than 130 trips around the world. Most participants are students, and each trip includes a chaplain and four FOCUS missionaries from the 137 campuses on which FOCUS serves. Please pray for all the trips participants this summer who will serve in Peru, as well as the 37 other countries throughout the world.

SEEK WHAT MOVES YOU

San Antonio, Texas, was the center of fellowship and revival for more than 13,000 college students and young adults across the nation, participating in the Fellowship of Catholic University Students (FOCUS) biennial conference, SEEK 2017.

Part of that number included a group of more than 70 students and 5 FOCUS missionaries from Orange County. Students from Cal State Fullerton and UC Irvine piled onto two charter busses on Jan. 2 for the daylong road trip from Orange County to the Henry B. Gonzales Convention Center in downtown San Antonio.

“I was a little skeptical on how the whole experience was going to be, but I couldn’t be more wrong,” said CSUF senior Charles Sandoval, a health science major from St. Boniface Church in Anaheim. “There were so many inspirational moments spent with thousands of fellow Catholics from around the country, and it sparked a flame in my heart.”

The five-day conference began on Jan. 3 with an opening afternoon Mass, presided by Archbishop of San Antonio Gustavo García-Siller, followed by a keynote from Mark Hart, executive vice president of content and identity for Catholic youth ministry organization Life Teen, and special guest speaker John O’Leary.

“We are in the city of Saint Anthony, patron saint of lost articles,” said Archbishop Gustavo in his opening homily. “The challenge is to find what moves you—make the most of your time here, and draw deeply on the Holy Spirit using your joy and energy as young people to revitalize faith in the world.”

The next few days of the conference were a whirlwind of masses, keynote speakers, men’s and women’s sessions, impact workshops, and fellowship—centered on the theme of “What Moves You” and finding a great adventure in Christ.

Fr. Robert Sirico led an informative session on a Catholic response to the 2016 presidential election, and noted that 31 percent of the incoming Congress is Catholic.

“The Church has been around for 2,000 years—no matter would happen after an election, we’re still here,” Fr. Sirico said.

In his keynote, author and theologian Dr. Edward Sri reminded the students of their image and worthiness in God the Father.

“We are not the sum total of our weakness and failures; we are the sum total of the Father’s love for us,” Sri said.

Musician, speaker, and Orange County native Jackie Francois-Angel also gave a workshop on the power of beauty.

“The acute experience of beauty—in music, art, nature, people, etc.—sparks something within us that leads us to God himself,” Francois-Angel shared. “Beauty on earth is just a glimpse of who God is…and if God is beauty, then every person who meets you should encounter the beauty of God.”

FOCUS’ “Awaken” beauty initiative at the conference included a stage for musicians, art and poetry exhibit encouraging students to explore their creative gifts as bridges to the Divine.

Students also had the opportunity for daily confession from over 300 priests from across the nation, spiritual direction/counseling, and 24-hour Adoration. Talents from the FOCUS Collective Band provided uplifting praise and worship.

Thousands of students, lay, and religious were reconciled and adored Christ on their knees, as priests processed reverently with the Blessed Sacrament around the main hall.

For the students and FOCUS missionaries from Orange County, many were moved by the experiences of deep prayer, and inspired to make room in their hearts and lives for Jesus.

“OC has some of the best faith-formed students that I’ve encountered in college…they are so open and so seeking,” said Emily O’Neill, team leader and FOCUS missionary at CSUF. “They have an experience of Catholicism, from their families and their parishes, and they just need the tools to take back to their peers on campus. So that’s what we’re here to give them, and why we brought them here.”

This school year, with more than 550 missionaries serving full-time on 125 college campuses, FOCUS seeks to form life-long relationships and disciples of Christ.

Rev. Gerald M. Horan, OSM, Episcopal Vicar for Faith Formation for the Diocese of Orange, believes the attendance is a “good sign” of the success of our young adult ministries back home.

“People say the younger generation is so against religion, but to be with 13,000 young people who are actively engaged with their faith is so powerful,” he said. “And to think that our own ministries [at Cal State Fullerton and UCI] were able to bring together a group of 50+ students…is an amazing achievement.”

Last year, Father Horan was able to get principal funding for the schools’ transportation to the conference from the CFO and Vicar General of the Diocese of Orange, with the full support and prayers of Bishop Kevin Vann.

“I hope that the relationships that were formed on this trip are going to be strengthened, continue to build in the Bible studies and other FOCUS activities, and that’s going to make us a richer church in our community,” Father Horan added.

Titan Catholic club president Christina Perry commended FOCUS for its “great commission in making disciples.”

“SEEK was one of the most life-changing experiences I’ve ever had,” shared Matthew Vasquez, a CSUF electrical engineer student and parishioner at St. Boniface Church in Anaheim. “I went to SEEK2015 two years ago in Nashville, and there I was able to experience the love of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist. This year in San Antonio, I was able to experience the love of God the Father for the first time and to know that He really is a good, good father.”

 

FOCUS CHAPLAIN SAYS YOUNG PEOPLE GATHERED TO GROW IN FAITH IS AWE-INSPIRING

WASHINGTON (CNS) — In a couple of short weeks, more than 12,500 people, mostly college students, planned to descend on San Antonio for the Jan. 3-7 SEEK2017 conference of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students.

The sight of so many college-age young people gathered to grow in their faith relationship with Christ and the Catholic Church is awe-inspiring, said Capuchin Franciscan Father John Lager, national chaplain for FOCUS since 2013.

The priest is often brought to tears to see so many young people “on their knees in great prayer,” he told Catholic News Service in a telephone interview from FOCUS headquarters west of Denver in Genesee, Colorado.

The biennial SEEK conference includes general sessions with keynote speakers, breakout sessions, liturgies, daily adoration, confessions and entertainment. About 25 bishops will be in and out of the gathering; and over 200 priests will be there, as will dozens of seminarians and religious sisters. At SEEK2015, priests heard more than 5,500 confessions.

A national Catholic outreach program founded in 1998, FOCUS invites college students into a relationship with Christ and the church. It is designed to inspire and prepare them for a life of evangelization, discipleship and friendship in which they lead others to do the same.

More than 550 full-time FOCUS missionaries are currently on 125 college campuses in 38 U.S. states this academic year. And in its first international expansion, FOCUS this year has missionaries in two pilot locations in Austria — Graz and Vienna.

Working with Father Lager at the national level are three other FOCUS chaplains — Fathers Brendan Rolling, Jay Buhman and Doug Grandon. Each oversees a region of the country. FOCUS also has campus chaplains.

“The model that FOCUS has used from very beginning that is most effective for young people today is to begin to have a conversation” with them, said Father Lager, who had recently returned from a visit to the Austria campus programs. “How do we continue to win them over in friendship? All of our lives are all about relationship. … Mother Teresa said the cry of the human heart is No. 1 to be loved and the greatest tragedy is when men and women are indifferent.”

Through FOCUS, young people “build relationships, hang out with each other and begin to find some common ground,” he said. “We have great conversations over coffee, go to concerts, play Frisbee, and after that with prayer and intention, we continue to build them up in the faith.”

FOCUS missionaries walk alongside young people, accompanying them “on this wonderful journey of faith — those are the things that really capture where our young men and women are,” Father Lager said.

Missionaries must make a two-year commitment to serve on a college campus after graduation. After that time, they may choose to move to another campus, begin a different career or enter religious life. They have to raise funds for their salaries. Each missionary goes through five weeks of intensive formation, that includes prayer and worship, and hands-on experience in evangelizing and team building. FOCUS says the training has been described as “one part boot camp, one part grad school and one part retreat.”

“Young people are dying to know the truth,” Father Lager said, adding that FOCUS is there to help them find that truth. “They have been sold a bill of goods that every need can be met by what the world has to offer, which is totally false. The real meaning comes about in not looking at No. 1 — me — but how can I give myself away in love and service?”

“We accompany them. You don’t do this by yourself. It’s all about what God does,” he said, adding FOCUS folks are collaborators with the Holy Spirit.

Out of that accompaniment have come vocations. Of the more than 20,000 FOCUS alumni so far, 600 have chosen a vocation as a priest or religious sister.

FOCUS is not a vocation ministry, Father Lager emphasized, but added that vocations are a byproduct of good Christian formation that FOCUS fosters.

Young Catholic men and women “want to know God’s will and to live out his call for them faithfully, whether that be marriage, priesthood or religious life,” said Sister Maria Juan Anderson, who recently professed first vows as a member of the Religious Sisters of Mercy of Alma, Michigan.

She served as a FOCUS missionary at North Dakota State University in Fargo from 2007 to 2010. She also was involved with the outreach as a student at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas.

“Being able to talk and share life with religious women, and witness their joy during my time as a missionary helped me to discern my own vocation to religious life,” Sister Maria Juan told CNS in an email.

“By helping young people to develop the habit of daily prayer, and fostering a rich participation in the sacramental life, FOCUS aids young people in coming to a place where they can encounter the love of Christ that enables one to hear the voice of the Father inviting them to a life given to him in their vocation,” she said.

“The very mission of FOCUS — to know Jesus Christ and to fulfill his great commission — is the mission of every priest and religious man and woman. It is the call for every baptized Christian,” she added.

Sister Therese Marie of the Visitation also is a former FOCUS missionary. She is a member of the Community of Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal. She, too, recently made her first vows.

“My time serving with FOCUS greatly deepened my relationship with Jesus Christ. As missionaries we received excellent formation in discernment … (are) encouraged to have regular spiritual direction, and committed to daily Mass and Holy Hour,” she said. “And my vocation, of course, is a direct fruit of my relationship with Jesus. Experiencing the joy of serving as a missionary disposed me to hear Jesus inviting me to an even more radical following of him: as his bride.”

“In today’s culture, it’s becoming harder for young people to hear Jesus’ call — but he is still calling!” Sister Therese Marie told CNS in an email.

“The desire in young people to give themselves radically out of love is still present. They just need the formation and encouragement to hear God’s call and respond with joy and trust,” she added.

“Eagerness for Jesus is here,” said Father Kerry Wakulich, a FOCUS chaplain at the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma. “Christianity and life are one in the same in Oklahoma.”

Like Father Lager, he looked forward to the SEEK2017 conference. “Awesomeness” is how he described it. “I wish this existed when I was 19 and in the Air Force. My favorite part — getting stopped every five minutes to hear a confession. On one occasion, four hours later, I realized, ‘I haven’t moved.’”

 

FOCUS CHAPLAIN SAYS YOUNG PEOPLE GATHERED TO GROW IN FAITH IS AWE-INSPIRING

WASHINGTON (CNS) — In a couple of short weeks, more than 12,500 people, mostly college students, planned to descend on San Antonio for the Jan. 3-7 SEEK2017 conference of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students.

The sight of so many college-age young people gathered to grow in their faith relationship with Christ and the Catholic Church is awe-inspiring, said Capuchin Franciscan Father John Lager, national chaplain for FOCUS since 2013.

The priest is often brought to tears to see so many young people “on their knees in great prayer,” he told Catholic News Service in a telephone interview from FOCUS headquarters west of Denver in Genesee, Colorado.

The biennial SEEK conference includes general sessions with keynote speakers, breakout sessions, liturgies, daily adoration, confessions and entertainment. About 25 bishops will be in and out of the gathering; and over 200 priests will be there, as will dozens of seminarians and religious sisters. At SEEK2015, priests heard more than 5,500 confessions.

A national Catholic outreach program founded in 1998, FOCUS invites college students into a relationship with Christ and the church. It is designed to inspire and prepare them for a life of evangelization, discipleship and friendship in which they lead others to do the same.

More than 550 full-time FOCUS missionaries are currently on 125 college campuses in 38 U.S. states this academic year. And in its first international expansion, FOCUS this year has missionaries in two pilot locations in Austria — Graz and Vienna.

Working with Father Lager at the national level are three other FOCUS chaplains — Fathers Brendan Rolling, Jay Buhman and Doug Grandon. Each oversees a region of the country. FOCUS also has campus chaplains.

“The model that FOCUS has used from very beginning that is most effective for young people today is to begin to have a conversation” with them, said Father Lager, who had recently returned from a visit to the Austria campus programs. “How do we continue to win them over in friendship? All of our lives are all about relationship. … Mother Teresa said the cry of the human heart is No. 1 to be loved and the greatest tragedy is when men and women are indifferent.”

Through FOCUS, young people “build relationships, hang out with each other and begin to find some common ground,” he said. “We have great conversations over coffee, go to concerts, play Frisbee, and after that with prayer and intention, we continue to build them up in the faith.”

FOCUS missionaries walk alongside young people, accompanying them “on this wonderful journey of faith — those are the things that really capture where our young men and women are,” Father Lager said.

Missionaries must make a two-year commitment to serve on a college campus after graduation. After that time, they may choose to move to another campus, begin a different career or enter religious life. They have to raise funds for their salaries. Each missionary goes through five weeks of intensive formation, that includes prayer and worship, and hands-on experience in evangelizing and team building. FOCUS says the training has been described as “one part boot camp, one part grad school and one part retreat.”

“Young people are dying to know the truth,” Father Lager said, adding that FOCUS is there to help them find that truth. “They have been sold a bill of goods that every need can be met by what the world has to offer, which is totally false. The real meaning comes about in not looking at No. 1 — me — but how can I give myself away in love and service?”

“We accompany them. You don’t do this by yourself. It’s all about what God does,” he said, adding FOCUS folks are collaborators with the Holy Spirit.

Out of that accompaniment have come vocations. Of the more than 20,000 FOCUS alumni so far, 600 have chosen a vocation as a priest or religious sister.

FOCUS is not a vocation ministry, Father Lager emphasized, but added that vocations are a byproduct of good Christian formation that FOCUS fosters.

Young Catholic men and women “want to know God’s will and to live out his call for them faithfully, whether that be marriage, priesthood or religious life,” said Sister Maria Juan Anderson, who recently professed first vows as a member of the Religious Sisters of Mercy of Alma, Michigan.

She served as a FOCUS missionary at North Dakota State University in Fargo from 2007 to 2010. She also was involved with the outreach as a student at Benedictine College in Atchison, Kansas.

“Being able to talk and share life with religious women, and witness their joy during my time as a missionary helped me to discern my own vocation to religious life,” Sister Maria Juan told CNS in an email.

“By helping young people to develop the habit of daily prayer, and fostering a rich participation in the sacramental life, FOCUS aids young people in coming to a place where they can encounter the love of Christ that enables one to hear the voice of the Father inviting them to a life given to him in their vocation,” she said.

“The very mission of FOCUS — to know Jesus Christ and to fulfill his great commission — is the mission of every priest and religious man and woman. It is the call for every baptized Christian,” she added.

Sister Therese Marie of the Visitation also is a former FOCUS missionary. She is a member of the Community of Franciscan Sisters of the Renewal. She, too, recently made her first vows.

“My time serving with FOCUS greatly deepened my relationship with Jesus Christ. As missionaries we received excellent formation in discernment … (are) encouraged to have regular spiritual direction, and committed to daily Mass and Holy Hour,” she said. “And my vocation, of course, is a direct fruit of my relationship with Jesus. Experiencing the joy of serving as a missionary disposed me to hear Jesus inviting me to an even more radical following of him: as his bride.”

“In today’s culture, it’s becoming harder for young people to hear Jesus’ call — but he is still calling!” Sister Therese Marie told CNS in an email.

“The desire in young people to give themselves radically out of love is still present. They just need the formation and encouragement to hear God’s call and respond with joy and trust,” she added.

“Eagerness for Jesus is here,” said Father Kerry Wakulich, a FOCUS chaplain at the University of Tulsa in Oklahoma. “Christianity and life are one in the same in Oklahoma.”

Like Father Lager, he looked forward to the SEEK2017 conference. “Awesomeness” is how he described it. “I wish this existed when I was 19 and in the Air Force. My favorite part — getting stopped every five minutes to hear a confession. On one occasion, four hours later, I realized, ‘I haven’t moved.'”

 

GUIDING ‘CRADLE’ CATHOLICS THROUGH COLLEGE

Curtis Martin saw the disturbing trend of cradle Catholics leaving the Church in their college years back in 1998 and founded the Fellowship of Catholic University Students, also known as FOCUS. His goal was to reach out to college students and, at a time in their lives that would have such a meaningful impact on their future, reconnect them with Jesus Christ’s joyful message of love and salvation.

Martin’s fledgling organization had just two missionaries at Benedictine College when, in that same year of 1998, he had an opportunity to meet Pope St. John Paul II and share his vision for FOCUS. After listening intently, the Holy Father gave Martin a powerful two-word reply, “Be soldiers.”

By 2015 FOCUS had almost 500 missionaries serving on 113 college campuses in 36 states and the District of Columbia. During that year, FOCUS reached an organizational milestone and it occurred here in Orange County. FOCUS established a missionary team on its 100th campus, the University of California at Irvine.

Typical FOCUS missionaries are recent college graduates who devote two or more years of their post-collegiate lives to reach out to their peers on campus. These missionaries meet the students where they are, on the quads or in the dorms, and through outreach events and one-on-one conversations share with them the joyous gift of the Gospel. Two local examples are Andrew Furphy, a campus missionary at Cal State Fullerton, and Philadelphia native Jule Coppa, who has spent the last two years reaching out to the students at U.C. Irvine.

As Coppa looks back on the time she has spent sharing her faith with college students, she recognizes how her time with FOCUS has changed her, too. “When I was in college, my life was all about me,” she says. “I was trying to figure out how I could use my gifts to benefit my life and bring about my glory. Now I know that my gifts are best put to use in the service of Christ and his Church, and by making a sincere gift of myself.”

Furphy’s life-changing encounter with FOCUS came during his freshman year at Northern Arizona University when he met a campus missionary named Brian. Though he had a hectic schedule as an accounting student, he learned to set aside some time for God each day. To any of his peers who may feel drawn to the work of FOCUS, he says, “One of the best things about being a FOCUS missionary is to see the Holy Spirit moving in others and using you in a way that you didn’t think was possible.”

More than 20,000 FOCUS alumni are involved with parishes throughout the United States, but the work of FOCUS is not limited to the domestic front. Since 2004, nearly 3,500 college students and FOCUS staff have traveled the world on FOCUS mission trips.

A young person who wants to be part of FOCUS can learn more at focus.org. The website also provides information for anyone might want to make an individual or corporate contribution to the organization or sponsor an individual campus missionary.

Of these “soldiers” FOCUS Founder and CEO Curtis Martin has said, “The place our missionaries work isn’t just a mission field; it’s a battlefield. They are the ones to walk courageously into the darkness of the culture to share the light of Christ with the whole world.”

FOCUS ELSEWHERE, REVIEW ADVISES MOVIEGOERS

NEW YORK (CNS) — More than most heist movies, the flimsy crime drama “Focus” (Warner Bros.) glamorizes wrongdoing. Add to that the lax sexual morals and gritty vocabulary of its characters, and the resulting package can be considered suitable for very few.

Directors and co-writers Glenn Ficarra and John Requa’s slick little jaunt through the underworld gets rolling when small-time swindler Jess (Margot Robbie) tries to extort money from a stranger she picks up in a bar. But her ill-chosen victim, Nicky (Will Smith), turns out to be an inveterate and accomplished con man who merely laughs off Jess’ amateurish scheme.

Recognizing Nicky’s superior gifts, Jess begs him to bring her into his gang and, after some hesitation, he agrees. But romance — needless to say, the two fall for each other — and robbery make for a volatile mix, leading to a variety of personal and professional conflicts.

Jess and Nicky eventually become entangled with sleazy car racing big shot Garriga (Rodrigo Santoro), who’s just as corrupt as they are. But their earlier targets are ordinary tourists out for a good time at the Super Bowl in New Orleans.

Though some of these are unfaithful husbands whose ethical lapses make them vulnerable, all of those on whom Jess and Nicky prey are implicitly portrayed, in the frequently trite script, as suckers who deserve what they get.

This fundamentally flawed outlook is accompanied by the occasional interlude of raunchy humor, taken-for-granted premarital physicality and a carpet-bombing campaign of expletives. As a result, not only the young and impressionable but even many grown moviegoers would be well advised to fix their focus elsewhere.

The film contains distorted values requiring mature discernment, brief scenes of semi-graphic sexual activity, adulterous situations, several uses of profanity and pervasive rough and crude language. The Catholic News Service classification is L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is R — restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.