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EPISODE #3
SOUNDS FROM THE SANCTUARY: THE AMERICAN HYMN TRADITION

Episode No. 3 The American Hymn Tradition

Often overlooked, the United States has a unique style of hymnody finding its roots in the church music brought from Europe by the pilgrims, the American south, and the folk tradition of the Appalachians. Experience settings of the most beloved and recognizable American hymns including Amazing Grace, Simple Gifts, Wondrous Love and many others. Alongside gorgeous recordings of these melodies by classical performers like Anonymous 4, Yo-Yo Ma, Tenebrae, and our own David Ball on the Fred Swann Organ, this show also features some rarely-heard recordings of American Hymns by mainstream artists including Johnny Cash, Ed Sheeran, and even the “mother of folk” herself, Jean Ritchie.

EPISODE #2
SOUNDS FROM THE SANCTUARY: THE MUSIC OF THE PSALMS

Episode No. 2 The Music of the Psalms

From the Latin motets of the Sistine Chapel deep within a 16th-century Vatican City to the Anglican tradition of the Cathedral of St. Paul’s in bustling 19th-century London, discover the universal beauty of the Psalms of David set in differing styles, genres, and languages. Featuring tracks from John Scott’s renowned recording of all 150 psalms from St. Paul’s, London and some newly-composed 21st-century psalms by living composers Fr. Jim Chepponis and Luke Mayernik.

EPISODE #1
SOUNDS FROM THE SANCTUARY: CELEBRATING 150 YEARS OF LOUIS VIERNE

Episode No. 1 Celebrating 150 Years of Louis Vierne

Sounds from the Sanctuary celebrates the 150th Anniversary of the birth of Louis Vierne, French composer and famed organist of Notre Dame in Paris, with a playlist of some of his greatest hits. Featuring recordings of American organists Dr. David Crean, Christopher Houlihan, George Baker, and Diane Bish; and historical recordings of Pierre Cochereau, Virgil Fox, Richard Morris, Stephen Cleobury, Vierne himself, and a never-before-heard recording of André Marchal.

RESPECT LIFE ROSARY PROCESSION DREW 100 TO CHRIST CATHEDRAL

In response to numerous parishioners from all over the diocese asking how they could help to bring more awareness to the preeminent priority of abortion during this election, parishioners from 18 parishes gathered Oct. 17 in a prayerful procession and recitation of the Rosary along Chapman Avenue in Garden Grove, just outside the grounds of Christ Cathedral. 

Organizer Tami Vogeler said, “All human life is equally sacred, but all issues are not equal. The issue of abortion is the preeminent priority issue…so, we felt a need to speak up.” 

Vogeler said the group was inspired by the statement from the USCCB Pro-life committee: “Last November, the U.S. bishops reaffirmed that ‘the threat of abortion remains our preeminent priority because it directly attacks life itself, because it takes place within the sanctuary of the family, and because of the number of lives destroyed.’ While we noted not to ‘dismiss or ignore other serious threats to human life and dignity such as racism, the environmental crisis, poverty, and the death penalty,’ we renewed our commitment to protect the most fundamental of all human rights – the right to live.”  

Chris Kenmore, Rick Garrett, Alejandra Baker and Tami Vogeler planned the event intended to encourage Catholics from all the parishes to join in the sidewalk vigil/Rosary procession to celebrate Respect Life Month and to honor the Blessed Mother as part of a Marian Devotion in the month of the Rosary.  

Alejandra Baker said, “We started at the parking lot of Christ Cathedral, on Chapman Avenue, processed in prayer towards Lewis Street, and remained at the corner of Chapman and Lewis Street, chanting the Rosary, alternating it in English and Spanish. We returned to the parking lot of Christ Cathedral where our Rosary procession ended.” 

 

PRO-LIFE FROM CONCEPTION TO NATURAL DEATH 

 

Pro-life is about more than the beginning of life. It also encompasses the end of life. The Catholic Church is committed to providing resources, along with community partners, that assist individuals and families at the end of life’s journey. 

The Whole Person Care Initiative is a comprehensive approach to caring for the sick and dying, spearheaded by Catholic healthcare, the Catholic Church, community healthcare providers, and public health leaders. This effort seeks to remake how our healthcare system addresses death and dying and lays out a vision for a network of care that addresses both the physical and spiritual dimensions of care. 

In 2018, the Diocese of Orange spearheaded the first local conference of its kind as part of the larger statewide Caring for the Whole Person Initiative, a collaborative project of the California Catholic Conference and the Alliance of Catholic Health Care. This day- long summit was open to professional care providers, community health leaders, parish volunteers, and clergy. Speakers included Ira Byock, MD, Megory Anderson, PhD. and Most Rev. Kevin Vann, Bishop of Orange. To view a few recordings and material presented on this day, please visit https://www.rcbo.org/resource/about-life-justice-and-peace/whole-care-conference/ 

RED MASS CELEBRATED AT CHRIST CATHEDRAL

The region’s legal professionals, scholars and judges on Oct. 5 convened on the campus of Christ Cathedral to celebrate the 32 annual Red Mass. Each year for centuries legal communities around the globe have gathered at local churches for worship and fellowship.  

“Each year, the Red Mass brings together the legal community of Orange County in joyful faith, fellowship, and worship, to seek the guidance of the Holy Spirit and receive God’s grace to strengthen our resolve as we face the ever-increasing challenges of our times,” explained William Malecki, Esq., Red Mass chairperson. 

The St. Thomas More Society of Orange County celebrated its first Red Mass in Orange County in 1988 with many jurists and members of the Bar actively participating.  

This year the evening Mass was celebrated in the plaza outside of Christ Cathedral due to COVID-19 restrictions. Bishop Kevin Vann was the celebrant of the Mass. Fr. Scott Borgman, the Judicial Vicar for the Diocese of Orange and a doctor of canon law, was the homilist.  

According to William Brown, partner at Brown Wegner LLP, and an event organizer, between 40 and 50 state and federal judges typically attend the Red Mass. They traditionally participate in the colorful procession, along with prominent local law professors. This year, no procession took place and attendees were socially distanced. 

Brown said, “We pray for the benefit of society that our legal system and those who work within it, regardless of their faith or tradition, will be blessed.” 

 

EPISODE#212
OC CATHOLIC RADIO: GUEST IS AUTHOR KIMBERLY ZEMBER

Each week, we bring you compelling conversation with church leaders and laity.

Today, host Rick Howick welcomes a guest who has a fascinating life story to tell. Her name is Kimberly Zember; and, she has recently authored a book called Restless Heart: My Struggle with Life & Sexuality.

The publisher is Sophia Institute Press. Tune in and hear her share from her heart in this candid interview.

 

Tune in and SHARE!

 

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 10/3/20

EPISODE #258
EMPOWERED BY THE SPIRIT: WHY GOD ALLOWS SUFFERING WITH GUEST FR. ROBERT SPITZER

Join Deacon Steve Greco and his guest, well- known author, professor and television personality, Fr. Robert Spitzer. Fr. Spitzer is president of the Magis Center and host on EWTN’s popular TV show, “Fr. Spitzer’s Universe.” 

On today’s enlightening broadcast, they’ll talk about the concept of why God allows suffering in our lives.

This is powerful stuff! So be sure to tune in and SHARE this podcast with others.

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 9/27/20

EPISODE#41
CATHEDRAL SQUARE: GUEST IS BISHOP KEVIN VANN

Get ready for an extra special episode of Cathedral Square featuring host Fr. Christopher Smith.

Today he welcomes our very own Bishop Kevin Vann to the studio. Bishop Vann has been on a few other shows we produce at the diocese, but this is his first time having an exclusive conversation with Fr. Christopher.

You are sure to enjoy these wonderful stories and reflections!

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 9/26/20

EPISODE#40
CATHEDRAL SQUARE: THE MEMORIAL GARDENS AT CHRIST CATHEDRAL

It’s time for another episode of Cathedral Square featuring host Fr. Christopher Smith.

We welcome to the program today Mike Wesner and Alma Ochoa. Mike is the Director of Catholic Cemeteries for the Diocese of Orange; and, Alma is the Associate Director of Operations for Cemeteries.

Today’s conversation covers all the goings-on in regards to the Memorial Gardens Cemetery on the Christ Cathedral campus.

Tune in for a fascinating and edifying discussion.

 

 

 

Originally broadcast on 9/12/20

MUSIC MINISTRY WRITES A NEW SONG

Church choirs everywhere have been told to stop singing. The COVID-19 virus is more easily spread, particularly among choir members, as a result of the deep inhaling and exhaling that occurs when singing. Today, only the cantor sings, with strict instructions not to prompt the congregation to join. 

OC Catholic asked Lauren McCaul to share how Christ Cathedral has adjusted to the restrictions on its music program. McCaul has served as Christ Cathedral’s music administrator for the past 4 years, and before that at St. Timothy’s in Laguna Niguel for 12 years. Prior to that, she served at a number of different locations including Holy Family Cathedral, St. Boniface, Our Lady Queen of Angels, St. John the Baptist, Mission Basilica San Juan Capistrano, Christ our Savior Cathedral, St. Edward’s, Mater Dei High School & Holy Trinity.  

 

HOW HAS THE PANDEMIC CHANGED THE MUSIC MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH ON A UNIVERSAL LEVEL, AS WELL AS A LOCAL LEVEL?  

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly been the strangest period of time I have lived through. The only comparison I can make is when 9/11 happened. It was the same sort of feeling that something fundamental had changed and there was a lot of unknown, both of which are true in this case. With this pandemic, however, both the Church in general and specifically the music ministry have been greatly impacted. With churches having to close to public worship, and so much yet to be learned about the way the virus spreads, music ministry as we have come to know it – with choirs and ensembles filled with joyful singers – has been temporarily altered. Out of an abundance of caution, choirs and other groups have been put on hold. Our music ministries throughout the diocese are scaling back and keeping it simple, while we are still learning more about how the virus spreads.  

 

SPECIFICALLY REGARDING CHRIST CATHEDRAL’S MUSIC MINISTRY, WHAT IMMEDIATE ACTION WAS TAKEN WHEN THE CHURCHES FIRST CLOSED?  

   

Before COVID-19, I would have been hard-pressed to imagine anything that would have closed the doors of our churches. Anyone who works in music ministry knew immediately that we had to find a way to continue to feed the faithful. At Christ Cathedral we are so blessed to have had in place the equipment necessary to livestream Masses. We had already been livestreaming for over a year, so when the pandemic hit, we were, in that sense, well prepared. Like every other parish in the diocese, we had to evaluate our means of communication with parishioners. Suddenly, e-blasts and websites became so much more important in communicating up-to-the-minute changes with our people, and also enabling them to continue their generous support of our parishes through online donations. The first weeks that our churches were closing were right as we entered Holy Week. For obvious reasons, it was just devastating! Holy Week is the most important week of the liturgical year, and our choirs had been preparing for months! It was also our first Holy Week in the newly dedicated Christ Cathedral, and we were so looking forward to celebrating these beautiful liturgies. Every single day in the week leading up to Holy Week we were being updated with new rules and recommendations regarding the liturgies themselves, the number of singers we were allowed to have, how far apart everyone needed to be, who was going to be allowed in the Cathedral… our music team must have planned and re-planned our Holy Week 20 times in the span of 10 days. We scaled our music ministry back to a quartet of singers plus a cantor and organist. After Holy Week, we scaled back even further to one cantor and organist at each Mass. This was both because of the contagious nature of the virus as well as a financial decision, with our weekly collections down. 

 

HAS THE ROLE OF THE CANTOR CHANGED?  

   

My role as cantor is something that has been on the forefront of my mind ever since the pandemic began. As cantors we are called to “animate” the assembly, we lead our congregations in sung worship. When public Masses ceased and everything moved to livestream with churches that were empty, it was very surreal. Just as I know my fellow cantors throughout the world had done, I had to rethink my role. On one hand, the building was empty, silent… animating an assembly you cannot see is essentially impossible.  On the other hand, our livestream was now reaching thousands more than it ever had, and for those watching and participating from home, we were a lifeline. I switched my focus to leading them… and not just in song, but as a result of having no congregation present, I also became the voice of the people quite literally!  

 

WHAT ARE YOUR HOPES MOVING FORWARD? 

 

My hope is that we can work our way back to a bit more normalcy. We love our music program at Christ Cathedral and have brought together wonderful singers from not just the Cathedral parish, but from all over, with our Diocesan Adult and Children’s Choirs. I hope that as we learn more about COVID-19 and eventually have a vaccine, we can begin to bring our singers back safely and return to the work of filling our liturgies with beautiful music. As we await those days, we will continue to serve those who are coming to Mass and those who are watching from home.